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Dubliners / James Joyce ; with an introduction and ... Read More

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  • 1 of 1 copy available at Kirtland Community College.

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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Kirtland Community College Library PR 6019 .O9 D8 1993 30775305484827 General Collection Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 0140186476
  • ISBN: 9780140186475
  • Physical Description: xlviii, 316 pages ; 20 cm.
  • Publisher: New York, N.Y., U.S.A. : Penguin, 1993.

Content descriptions

Formatted Contents Note:
Introduction -- Notes on introduction -- Notes on ... Read More
Summary, etc.:
Fifteen stories evoke the character, atmosphere, ... Read More
Subject: Dublin (Ireland) > Fiction.
Genre: Domestic fiction.

Syndetic Solutions - Author Notes for ISBN Number 0140186476
Dubliners
Dubliners
by Joyce, James; Brown, Terence (Introduction by, Notes by)
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Author Notes

Dubliners

James Joyce was born on February 2, 1882, in Dublin, Ireland, into a large Catholic family. Joyce was a very good pupil, studying poetics, languages, and philosophy at Clongowes Wood College, Belvedere College, and the Royal University in Dublin. Joyce taught school in Dalkey, Ireland, before marrying in 1904. Joyce lived in Zurich and Triest, teaching languages at Berlitz schools, and then settled in Paris in 1920 where he figured prominently in the Parisian literary scene, as witnessed by Ernest Hemingway's A Moveable Feast. Joyce's collection of fine short stories, Dubliners, was published in 1914, to critical acclaim. Joyce's major works include A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, Finnegans Wake, and Stephen Hero. Ulysses, published in 1922, is considered one of the greatest English novels of the 20th century. The book simply chronicles one day in the fictional life of Leopold Bloom, but it introduces stream of consciousness as a literary method and broaches many subjects controversial to its day. As avant-garde as Ulysses was, Finnegans Wake is even more challenging to the reader as an important modernist work. Joyce died just two years after its publication, in 1941. (Bowker Author Biography)


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