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The better angels : five women who changed Civil War America / by Plumb, Robert C.,author.; Griffith, Elisabeth,writer of foreword.;
The better angels of our nature -- Women in Antelbellum America -- The underground railroad -- Abolitionism in America -- The "Seething Hell of War" -- Noble watchwords and inspiring ideas -- Treading to the wounded and missing -- The prolonged war -- "With malice toward none, with charity for all" -- "Joy My Freedom!" -- Women in post-Civil war America -- Concluding remarkable lives -- The angels among us still -- "Contemplating their example" -- Voce Angeli, or "Voices of the AngelsThis multi-layered biography examines five remarkable women who made important contributions to the Union cause at various stages before, during, and following the defining years of the American Civil WarDescription based on print version record.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest, 2018. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Women and war;
On-line resources: https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/kirtland-ebooks/detail.action?docID=6023662 -- Available online. Click here to access.;
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Worth a dozen men : women and nursing in the Civil War South / by Hilde, Libra Rose.;
Includes bibliographical references (p. 293-306) and index.State and private hospitals -- Matrons' work -- Becoming a nurse -- Ideal nursing -- Civilian women and Confederate medical care -- The hospital labor dilemma -- Conflict and cooperation -- Nursing and personal growth -- Aftermath and social change.
Subjects: Confederate States of America. Army; Military nursing; Military hospitals; Women;
© 2012., University of Virginia Press,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Women's war : fighting and surviving the American Civil War / by McCurry, Stephanie,author.;
The Civil War is remembered as a war of brother against brother, with women standing innocently on the sidelines. But battlefield realities soon challenged this simplistic understanding of women's place in war. Stephanie McCurry shows that women were indispensable to the unfolding of the Civil War, as they have been--and continue to be--in all wars. With a trio of dramatic stories, McCurry explores unique facets of women's wartime experiences, each one of which played an important part in redefining the meaning and stakes of the Civil War. Clara Judd, a female spy who was imprisoned by the Union for treason, sparked a heated controversy over the principle of civilian immunity, leading to lasting changes in the international laws of war. The hundreds of thousands of enslaved women who escaped to Union lines during the conflict upended military emancipation policies aimed only at enslaved male soldiers. Union leaders responded by casting fugitive black women as "soldiers' wives," offering them a protection of sorts but placing a lasting obstacle on their path to freedom. In the war's aftermath, the former Confederate Gertrude Thomas wrestled with her loss of status amid economic devastation, social collapse, and the new freedom of her former slaves. War and emancipation touched even her intimate family, revealing the full extent of the break in history Reconstruction represented.-- Provided by publisher.Includes bibliographical references and index.Enemy women and the laws of war -- The story of the black soldier's wife -- Reconstructing a life amid the ruins.
Subjects: Spies; Women spies; Women slaves; Fugitive slaves; Civil-military relations; Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877);
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Women's war : fighting and surviving the American Civil War / by McCurry, Stephanie,author.;
Includes bibliographical references and index.Enemy women and the laws of war -- The story of the black soldier's wife -- Reconstructing a life amidst the ruins.The Civil War is remembered as a war of brother against brother, with women standing innocently on the sidelines. But battlefield realities soon challenged this simplistic understanding of women's place in war. Stephanie McCurry shows that women were indispensable to the unfolding of the Civil War, as they have been--and continue to be--in all wars. With a trio of dramatic stories, McCurry explores unique facets of women's wartime experiences, each one of which played an important part in redefining the meaning and stakes of the Civil War. Clara Judd, a female spy who was imprisoned by the Union for treason, sparked a heated controversy over the principle of civilian immunity, leading to lasting changes in the international laws of war. The hundreds of thousands of enslaved women who escaped to Union lines during the conflict upended military emancipation policies aimed only at enslaved male soldiers. Union leaders responded by casting fugitive black women as "soldiers' wives," offering them a protection of sorts but placing a lasting obstacle on their path to freedom. In the war's aftermath, the former Confederate Gertrude Thomas wrestled with her loss of status amid economic devastation, social collapse, and the new freedom of her former slaves. War and emancipation touched even her intimate family, revealing the full extent of the break in history Reconstruction represented.-- Provided by publisher.Description based on print version record.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest, 2018. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Spies; Women spies; Women slaves; Fugitive slaves; Civil-military relations; Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877);
On-line resources: http://libproxy.kirtland.edu:2048/login?url=https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/kirtland-ebooks/detail.action?docID=5747033 -- Available online. Click here to access.;
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Beyond Rosie : a documentary history of women and World War II / by Brock, Julia,editor of compilation.; Dickey, Jennifer W.,editor of compilation.; Harker, Richard J. W.,editor of compilation.; Lewis, Catherine M.,editor of compilation.;
Includes bibliographical references (pages 241-247), webliography, and index.Machine generated contents note: ch. 1 Into the Factories -- ch. 2 New Opportunities, New Challenges -- ch. 3 Women's Auxiliary Services -- ch. 4 "Make Do and Mend": Women and the Home Front -- ch. 5 The Secret War.
Subjects: World War, 1939-1945; World War, 1939-1945; World War, 1939-1945; Women; Women;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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An encyclopedia of American women at war : from the home front to the battlefields / by Frank, Lisa Tendrich.;
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.V. 1. A-L -- v. 2. M-Z.This encyclopedia contains entries on all of the major themes, organizations, wars, and biographies related to the history of women and the American military. The book traces the evolution of their roles - as leaders, spies, soldiers, and nurses - and illustrates women's participation in actions on the ground as well as in making the key decisions in developing conflicts. From the colonial conflicts with European powers to the current War on Terror, coverage is comprehensive, with material organized in an easy-to-use A-Z ready-reference format. --from back cover.
Subjects: Women and war; Women and the military;
© ©2013., ABC-CLIO,
Available copies: 2 / Total copies: 2
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Trials and triumphs : women of the American Civil War / by Culpepper, Marilyn Mayer.;
Includes bibliographical references (pages 395-427).A nation torn asunder -- Slaves, soldiers, free people -- Anxiety-The irrepressible companion -- The refugee experience -- The ravages of war -- The battle against privation -- "Much to do"-Part I -- "Much to do"-Part I -- The Florence Nightingales of the Civil War -- Peace at last.Military, political, and economic aspects of the American Civil War have been minutely examined and re-examined in thousands of published volumes. Relatively little, however, has been written about the courageous women who endured loneliness and upheaval on the home front or who ventured to the sites of combat to witness the horrors of war first hand. In Trials and Triumphs Marilyn Mayer Culpepper provides incomparable insights into women's lives during America's Civil War era. Her respect for these nineteenth-century women and their experiences, as well as her engaging and intimate style, enable Culpepper to transport readers into a tumultuous time of death, destruction, and privation--into a world turned upside down, an environment that seemed as strange to contemporaries as it does in our own time. Culpepper has uncovered forgotten images of America's bloodiest conflict contained in the diaries and correspondence of more than 500 women. Trials and Triumphs reveals the anxiety, hardship, turmoil, and tragedy that women endured during the war years. It reveals the fierce loyalty and enmity that nearly severed the Union, the horror of enemy occupation, and even the desperate austerity of an itinerant refugee life. Just as the Civil War influenced culture and government, it shaped the attitudes of a new breed of pioneering woman. As the war progressed, either by choice or by default, men turned over more and more responsibility to women on the home front. As a result, women began to break free from the "cult of domesticity" to expand career opportunities by managing farms and plantations, by going to work in offices, stores, and in large businesses; they managed fairs that raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for soldiers' relief; they worked as teachers and as health-care providers. By war's end, women on both sides of the conflict proved to themselves and to a nearly shattered nation that the appellation "weaker sex" was a misnomer.
Subjects: Women;
© 1991., Michigan State University Press,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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A few good women : America's military women from World War I to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan / by Monahan, Evelyn.; Neidel-Greenlee, Rosemary,1941-;
Includes bibliographical references (p. [435]-455) and index."The never-before-told story of the U.S. women's military corps: the women who fought for the right to defend their country by serving in our armed forces with full military rank and benefits-- a fight that continues today for American military women who want to serve in combat support positions and in frontline combat units. Using interviews, correspondence, and diaries, as well as archival material, [the authors] tell the remarkable story of America's 'few good women' who today make up more than 15 percent of the U.S. armed forces and who serve alongside men in almost every capacity."--Cloth Book jacket.
Subjects: Women and war;
© 2011, c2010., Anchor Books,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Cherokee women in crisis : Trail of Tears, Civil War, and allotment, 1838-1907 / by Johnston, Carolyn,1948-;
Includes bibliographical references (p. [197]-211) and index.I: Crisis of gender -- Cultural continuity -- Early catalysts for change -- The trail of tears -- II: Crisis of the Civil War and reconstruction -- The Civil War -- Reconstruction -- III: Crisis of allotment -- Allotment.
Subjects: Cherokee women; Cherokee women; Cherokee women; Trail of Tears, 1838-1839.; Indians of North America; Indian allotments; Cherokee (volk); Vrouwen.;
© c2003., University of Alabama Press,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Capital dames : the Civil War and the women of Washington, 1848-1868 / by Roberts, Cokie.;
Includes bibliographical references (pages 423-492).Meet the women of Washington, 1848-1856 -- Jessie runs for president but Harriet takes the White House and Mary Jane reports, 1856-1858 -- Varina leads and leaves as Abby drops by, 1859-1861 -- Rose goes to jail, Jessie goes to the White House, Dorothea goes to work, 1861 -- Rose is released, Clara goes to war, Louisa May briefly nurses, 1862 -- Lizzie reports on the action, Janet goes to camp, Louisa takes charge, 1863 -- Anna speaks, Jessie campaigns (again), Sojourner visits, 1864 -- One Mary leaves, one Mary hangs, and Lois writes about it all, 1865 -- Virginia and Varina return, Sara survives, Mary is humiliated, Kate loses, 1866-1868.With the outbreak of the Civil War, the small, social Southern town of Washington, D.C. found itself caught between warring sides in a four-year battle that would determine the future of the United States. After the declaration of secession, many fascinating Southern women left the city, leaving their friends -- such as Adele Cutts Douglas and Elizabeth Blair Lee -- to grapple with questions of safety and sanitation as the capital was transformed into an immense Union army camp and later a hospital. With their husbands, brothers, and fathers marching off to war, either on the battlefield or in the halls of Congress, the women of Washington joined the cause as well. And more women went to the Capital City to enlist as nurses, supply organizers, relief workers, and journalists. Many risked their lives making munitions in a highly flammable arsenal, toiled at the Treasury Department printing greenbacks to finance the war, and plied their needlework skills at The Navy Yard -- once the sole province of men -- to sew canvas gunpowder bags for the troops. Sifting through newspaper articles, government records, and private letters and diaries -- many never before published -- Roberts brings the war-torn capital into focus through the lives of its formidable women.
Subjects: Women; Politicians' spouses; Women; Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877); Women;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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