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Food fight : GMOs and the future of the American diet / by Jenkins, McKay,1963-;
Includes bibliographical references (pages 289-309) and index.Prologue: Square tomatoes -- Are GMOs safe? Is that the right question? -- The long, paved road to industrial food, and the disappearance of the American farmer -- Mapping and engineering and playing Prometheus -- The fruit that saved an island -- Trouble in paradise -- Fighting for that which feeds us -- Feeding the world -- The plant that started civilization, and the plant that could save it -- Can GMOs be sustainable? -- The farm next door -- Epilogue: Getting our hands dirty.Are GMOs really that bad? An environmental journalist takes a fresh look at what they actually mean for our food system and for us. In the past two decades, GMOs have come to dominate the American diet. Advocates hail them as the future of food, an enhanced method of crop breeding that can help feed an ever-increasing global population and adapt to a rapidly changing environment. Critics, meanwhile, call for their banishment, insisting GMOs were designed by overeager scientists and greedy corporations to bolster an industrial food system that forces us to rely on cheap, unhealthy, processed food so they can turn an easy profit. In response, health-conscious brands such as Trader Joe's and Whole Foods have started boasting that they are "GMO-free," and companies like Monsanto have become villains in the eyes of average consumers. Where can we turn for the truth? Are GMOs an astounding scientific breakthrough destined to end world hunger? Or are they simply a way for giant companies to control a problematic food system? Environmental writer McKay Jenkins traveled across the country to answer these questions and discovered that the GMO controversy is more complicated than meets the eye. He interviewed dozens of people on all sides of the debate -- scientists hoping to engineer new crops that could provide nutrients to people in the developing world, Hawaiian papaya farmers who credit GMOs with saving their livelihoods, and local farmers in Maryland who are redefining what it means to be "sustainable." The result is a comprehensive examination of the state of our food system and a much-needed guide for consumers to help them make more informed choices about what to eat for their next meal.
Subjects: Transgenic plants.; Crops;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Genetically modified planet : environmental impacts of genetically engineered plants / by Stewart, C. Neal.;
Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-236).Introduction : catastrophic calamities and clucking cacophonies -- Crops and weeds : it's hard to be a wild thing when you're domesticated -- Plant biotechnology : the magic of making GM plants -- Gene flow : it's a weed, it's a transgene, it's Superweed! -- Contamination : transgenes in Mexican corn? -- Killer corn : monarch butterfly exterminators? -- Better living through biology : not killing the good insects by accident -- Bt resistance management : getting off the treadmill -- Swap meet from heck : trading sequences between viruses and transgenes -- Superweeds revisited : tall stacks of transgenes and waffling gene flow -- Green and Greener : environmentalism, agriculture, and GM plants -- Futurama : Greenetic engineering for a greener tomorrow -- Conclusion : out of right field and into home.
Subjects: Transgenic plants.; Plant genetic engineering.; Transgenic plants; Plant genetic engineering;
© 2004., Oxford University Press,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Principles of biotechnology / by Crawford, Christina A.,1983-editor.;
Includes bibliographical references and index.Publisher's Note -- Editor's Introduction -- Contributors -- Alternative energy sources -- Animal breeding -- Animal testing -- Animals as a medical resource -- Anthrax and biological warfare -- Anthropogeomorphology -- Antibiotic-resistant bacteria -- Antibiotics as defense against biological warfare -- Archaebacteria -- Artificial intelligence -- Artificial organs -- Audio engineering -- Bioassays -- Biochemical engineering -- Biodetectors -- Bioenergy technologies -- Bioengineering -- Biofertilizers -- Biofuels -- Biofuels and synthetic fuels -- Bioinformatics -- Biological terrorism -- Biological weapon identification -- Biomathematics -- Biomechanical engineering -- Biomechanics -- Biometric eye scanners -- Biometric identification systems -- Bionics and biomedical engineering -- Biopesticides and the environment -- Bioprocess engineering -- Bioremediation -- Biosensors -- Biostratigraphy -- Biosynthetics -- Biotechnology and genetic engineering -- Biotoxins -- Botany and genetic engineering -- Botulinum toxin as a biological weapon -- Bubonic plague as a biological weapon -- Cell and tissue engineering -- Cloning -- Cloning of plants -- CRISPR-Cas9 -- Cryogenics -- Desalination plants and technology -- Detection and prevention of food poisoning -- Diamond v. Chakrabarty -- DNA anaylsis -- DNA banks for endangered animals -- DNA database controversies -- DNA extraction from hair, bodily fluids, and tissues -- DNA fingerprinting as evidence --DNA isolation methods -- DNA profiling -- DNA recognition instruments -- DNA sequencing and crime scenes -- DNA typing -- DNA: recombinant technology -- Dolly the sheep -- Drug testing -- Engineering -- Environmental biotechnology -- Enzyme engineering -- Estrogens from plants -- Fiber technologies -- Genetic engineering -- Genetic resources -- Genetically engineered pharmaceuticals -- Genetically modified food production -- Genetically modified organisms -- Genetically altered bacteria -- Genomics -- Human genetic engineering -- Human-computer interaction -- Hybridization (botany) -- Industrial fermentation -- Intelligence -- Intensive farming --- Medicinal plants -- Metabolic engineering -- Microscopy -- Mitochondrial DNA analysis and typing -- Model organisms -- Molecular systematics -- Nanotechnology -- Nanotechnology and the environment -- Neural engineering -- Night vision technology -- Pasteurization and irradiation -- Pathogen genomic sequencing -- Performance-enhancing drugs -- Plant biotechnology -- Plant breeding and propagation -- Plant cells: molecular level -- Plants as a medical resource -- Polymerase chain reaction -- Prokaryotes -- Proteomics and protein engineering -- Radiocarbon dating -- Refuse-derived fuel -- Renewable and nonrenewable resources -- Reproductive science and engineering -- Scanning probe microscopy -- Science of cloning -- Seed banks -- Stem cell research and technology -- Synthetic fuels -- Tularemia as a bioweapon -- Zygomycetes -- Important figures in biotechnology: David Baltimore -- Francoise Barre-Sinoussi -- Paul Berg -- J. Michael Bishop -- Herbert Wayne Boyer -- Erwin Chargaff -- Stanley Cohen -- Francis S. Collins -- Carl F. Cori -- Erasistratus -- Alexander Fleming -- Camillo Golgi -- Carol W. Greider -- Alfred D. Hershey -- Edward B. Lewis -- Konrad Lorenz -- Barbara McClintock -- Christiane Nusslein-Volhard -- Frederick Sanger -- Hans Spemann -- Jack W. Szostak -- J. Craig Venter -- James D. Watson -- Edmund Beecher Wilson -- Norton David Zinder -- Appendixes: Time Line of Inventions and Scientific Advancements in Biotechnology -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Subject Index.Provides students and researchers with an introduction to the fundamentals of biotechnology.
Subjects: Biotechnology.;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Principles of Biotechnology / by Crawford, Christina A.,1983-editor.;
10-A.Provides students and researchers with an introduction to the fundamentals of biotechnology.Includes bibliographical references and index.Publisher's Note -- Editor's Introduction -- Contributors -- Alternative energy sources -- Animal breeding -- Animal testing -- Animals as a medical resource -- Anthrax and biological warfare -- Anthropogeomorphology -- Antibiotic-resistant bacteria -- Antibiotics as defense against biological warfare -- Archaebacteria -- Artificial intelligence -- Artificial organs -- Audio engineering -- Bioassays -- Biochemical engineering -- Biodetectors -- Bioenergy technologies -- Bioengineering -- Biofertilizers -- Biofuels -- Biofuels and synthetic fuels -- Bioinformatics -- Biological terrorism -- Biological weapon identification -- Biomathematics -- Biomechanical engineering -- Biomechanics -- Biometric eye scanners -- Biometric identification systems -- Bionics and biomedical engineering -- Biopesticides and the environment -- Bioprocess engineering -- Bioremediation -- Biosensors -- Biostratigraphy -- Biosynthetics -- Biotechnology and genetic engineering -- Biotoxins -- Botany and genetic engineering -- Botulinum toxin as a biological weapon -- Bubonic plague as a biological weapon -- Cell and tissue engineering -- Cloning -- Cloning of plants -- CRISPR-Cas9 -- Cryogenics -- Desalination plants and technology -- Detection and prevention of food poisoning -- Diamond v. Chakrabarty -- DNA anaylsis -- DNA banks for endangered animals -- DNA database controversies -- DNA extraction from hair, bodily fluids, and tissues -- DNA fingerprinting as evidence --DNA isolation methods -- DNA profiling -- DNA recognition instruments -- DNA sequencing and crime scenes -- DNA typing -- DNA: recombinant technology -- Dolly the sheep -- Drug testing -- Engineering -- Environmental biotechnology -- Enzyme engineering -- Estrogens from plants -- Fiber technologies -- Genetic engineering -- Genetic resources -- Genetically engineered pharmaceuticals -- Genetically modified food production -- Genetically modified organisms -- Genetically altered bacteria -- Genomics -- Human genetic engineering -- Human-computer interaction -- Hybridization (botany) -- Industrial fermentation -- Intelligence -- Intensive farming --- Medicinal plants -- Metabolic engineering -- Microscopy -- Mitochondrial DNA analysis and typing -- Model organisms -- Molecular systematics -- Nanotechnology -- Nanotechnology and the environment -- Neural engineering -- Night vision technology -- Pasteurization and irradiation -- Pathogen genomic sequencing -- Performance-enhancing drugs -- Plant biotechnology -- Plant breeding and propagation -- Plant cells: molecular level -- Plants as a medical resource -- Polymerase chain reaction -- Prokaryotes -- Proteomics and protein engineering -- Radiocarbon dating -- Refuse-derived fuel -- Renewable and nonrenewable resources -- Reproductive science and engineering -- Scanning probe microscopy -- Science of cloning -- Seed banks -- Stem cell research and technology -- Synthetic fuels -- Tularemia as a bioweapon -- Zygomycetes -- Important figures in biotechnology: David Baltimore -- Francoise Barre-Sinoussi -- Paul Berg -- J. Michael Bishop -- Herbert Wayne Boyer -- Erwin Chargaff -- Stanley Cohen -- Francis S. Collins -- Carl F. Cori -- Erasistratus -- Alexander Fleming -- Camillo Golgi -- Carol W. Greider -- Alfred D. Hershey -- Edward B. Lewis -- Konrad Lorenz -- Barbara McClintock -- Christiane Nusslein-Volhard -- Frederick Sanger -- Hans Spemann -- Jack W. Szostak -- J. Craig Venter -- James D. Watson -- Edmund Beecher Wilson -- Norton David Zinder -- Appendixes: Time Line of Inventions and Scientific Advancements in Biotechnology -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Subject Index.
Subjects: Biotechnology.; Biotechnology.;
On-line resources: https://libproxy.kirtland.edu/login?url=https://online.salempress.com/doi/book/10.3331/PRBio -- Available online. Click here to access.;
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Reaching for the sun : how plants work / by King, John,1938-;
Includes bibliographical references and index."From their ability to use energy from sunlight to make their own food, to combating attacks from diseases and predators, plants have evolved an amazing range of life-sustaining strategies. Written with the non-specialist in mind, John King's lively natural history explains how plants function, from how they gain energy and nutrition to how they grow, develop and ultimately die. New to this edition is a section devoted to plants and the environment, exploring how problems created by human activities, such as global warming, pollution of land, water and air, and increasing ocean acidity, are impacting on the lives of plants. King's narrative provides a simple, highly readable introduction, with boxes in each chapter offering additional or more advanced material for readers seeking more detail. He concludes that despite the challenges posed by growing environmental perils, plants will continue to dominate our planet"--Preface to the Second Edition -- Preface to the First Edition -- Part I. Plants and energy. 1. Photosynthesis: the leitmotiv of life -- 2. Plant respiration: breathing without lungs -- Part II. Plant nutrition. 3. Plants are cool, but why? -- 4. Nutrition for the healthy lifestyle -- 5. Nitrogen, nitrogen, everywhere ... -- 6. Transport of delights -- Part III. Growth and development. 7. Growth: the long and the short of it -- 8. The time of their lives -- 9. A dash of seasoning -- 10. Dormancy: a matter of survival -- 11. Color, fragrance, and flavor -- Part IV. Stress, defense, and decline. 12. Stressful tranquility -- 13. Chemical warfare -- 14. Senescence and death -- Part V. Plants and the environment. 15. Elemental cycles -- 16. The human touch -- Appendix : Genetic engineering : an essential tool in a rapidly changing world.
Subjects: Plants.; Botany.;
© 2011., Cambridge University Press,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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GMO food : a reference handbook / by Newton, David E.,author.;
Preface to the First Edition / Preface to the Second Edition / 1. BACKGROUND AND HISTORY -- Hybridization -- The Birth of Genetics -- The Gene -- The Process of Genetic Engineering -- Concerns about rDNA Research -- History of rDNA Regulation -- Breakthroughs in rDNA Research -- Genetically Modified Animals -- Technical Problems -- Regulatory Issues -- Genetically Modified Plants -- ByPreface to the First Edition / Preface to the Second Edition / 1. BACKGROUND AND HISTORY -- Hybridization -- The Birth of Genetics -- The Gene -- The Process of Genetic Engineering -- Concerns about rDNA Research -- History of rDNA Regulation -- Breakthroughs in rDNA Research -- Genetically Modified Animals -- Technical Problems -- Regulatory Issues -- Genetically Modified Plants -- Bt Crops -- Types of Genetically Modified Plants -- Conclusion – References / 2. PROBLEMS, CONTROVERSIES, AND SOLUTIONS -- Opposition to Genetically Modified Foods in the United States -- Public Opinion on Genetically Modified Foods -- Public Opinion in the United States -- Public Opinion in Europe -- Regulation of Genetically Modified Crops and Foods -- Regulation in the United States -- Regulation in the European Union -- Labeling of Genetically Modified Foods -- The Labeling Issue in the EU -- The Labeling Issue in the United States -- GMO Regulations Worldwide -- Genetically Modified Crops and Foods: Pros and Cons -- Agricultural System -- Potential Benefits -- Potential Harm -- Human Health -- Potential Benefits -- Potential Harm -- The Natural Environment -- Potential Benefits -- Potential Harm -- Potential Social and Economic Harm -- Conclusion – References / 3. PERSPECTIVES -- Introduction -- Genetic Engineering in Agriculture: Uncertainties and Risks - Debal Deb; The Case for Teaching Food in Schools - Yussra MT Ebrahim; Improving Crops with CRISPR - Phill Jones; In the Know: Genetically Modified Foods - Rashmi Nemade; Genetically Modified Organisms - Tony Owen; GMO Foods in Developing Countries - Santosh Pandey; Labeling Bioengineered Foods: Theory vs. Reality - Ellen Rubin; Genetically Modified Crops in Africa: Fear of the Unknown? - Elizabeth Shoo; Accepting Genetically Modified Crops in India – Sweta; A Growing World Demands New Food Technology - Susan Young / 4. PROFILES – Introduction -- Biotechnology Regulatory Services Biotechnology Innovation Organization -- José Bové (1953-) -- Herbert Boyer (1936-) -- Canadian Biotechnology Action Network -- Center for Food Safety -- Emmanuelle Charpentier (1968-) -- Mary-Dell Chilton (1939-) -- Stanley N. Cohen (1935-) -- Crop Life International -- Jennifer Doudna (1964-) -- Food & Water Watch -- Robert T. Fraley (1953-) -- John E. Franz (1929-) -- Dennis Gonsalves (1943-) -- Greenpeace International -- International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications -- Steve Lindow (1951-) -- Mark Lynas (1973-) -- Monsanto (Bayer Crop Science) -- Non-GMO Project -- Ingo Potrykus (1933-) -- Maxine Singer (1931-) -- Marc van Montagu (1933-) -- World Health Organization / 5. DATA AND DOCUMENTS -- Introduction -- Data -- Table 5.1. Genetically Engineered Crops in the United States, 2000-19 (percent of all planted crop; all genetically engineered varieties) -- Table 5.2. Number of Releases of Genetically Engineered Organism Varieties Approved by APHIS, 1985-2013 -- Table 5.3. Total Number of GMO Crop Releases Approved by APHIS, to 2013 -- Table 5.4. Number of Releases Approved by APHIS by Genetic Trait, to 2013 -- Table 5.5. Prevalence of Bt IR and Stacked Gene Crops in U.S. Agriculture, 2000-19 (percentage of each crop) -- Documents -- Plant Patent Act of 1930 -- Diamond v. Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. 303 (1980) -- Coordinated Framework for the Regulation of Biotechnology (1986) -- Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (2000) -- Regulation of Genetically Modified Foods by the European Union (2003) -- Mendocino County (California) Ban on Genetically Modified Crops (2004/2019) -- The Safety of Genetically Modified Foods, GAO Report (2002) -- Invoking of Preemption (North Dakota, SB2277; 2005) -- Monsanto Co. v. Geertson Seed Farms, 561 U.S. 139 (2010) -- Bowman v. Monsanto, et al., 569 U.S. 11-796 (2013) -- National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (Public Law 114-216) (2016) -- National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (2018) -- Regulation of Gene-Editing Technology (2018) / 6. RESOURCES -- Books -- Articles -- Reports -- Internet Sources / 7. CHRONOLOGY – Glossary – Index.GMO Food: A Reference Handbook is intended to serve as a research guide for young adults in high school and beyond. Students at all grade levels should be able to use the book as an introduction to the history of genetic engineering of organisms and the use of this technology for the development of new forms of crops and foods.They will learn briefly about historic methods of plant and animal modification (such as cross-breeding) and, in more detail, how discoveries since the late nineteenth century have greatly changed the process of plant and animal modification. These discoveries include important steps forward in genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, genetic engineering, and related fields. They will also learn about the variety of social, political, philosophical, economic, and other issues that have arisen alongside these scientific advances, as well as about some of the laws, regulations, and other solutions that have been developed for dealing with the range of attitudes about genetically modified foods. The second edition covers developments since 2014. -- provided by publisher.Description based on print version record.Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest, 2018. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest affiliated libraries.
Subjects: Electronic books.; Genetically modified foods;
On-line resources: https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/kirtland-ebooks/detail.action?docID=6606563 -- Available  online. Click here to access.;
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GMO food : a reference handbook / by Newton, David E.,author.;
Preface to the First Edition / Preface to the Second Edition / 1. BACKGROUND AND HISTORY -- Hybridization -- The Birth of Genetics -- The Gene -- The Process of Genetic Engineering -- Concerns about rDNA Research -- History of rDNA Regulation -- Breakthroughs in rDNA Research -- Genetically Modified Animals -- Technical Problems -- Regulatory Issues -- Genetically Modified Plants -- Bt Crops -- Types of Genetically Modified Plants -- Conclusion – References / 2. PROBLEMS, CONTROVERSIES, AND SOLUTIONS -- Opposition to Genetically Modified Foods in the United States -- Public Opinion on Genetically Modified Foods -- Public Opinion in the United States -- Public Opinion in Europe -- Regulation of Genetically Modified Crops and Foods -- Regulation in the United States -- Regulation in the European Union -- Labeling of Genetically Modified Foods -- The Labeling Issue in the EU -- The Labeling Issue in the United States -- GMO Regulations Worldwide -- Genetically Modified Crops and Foods: Pros and Cons -- Agricultural System -- Potential Benefits -- Potential Harm -- Human Health -- Potential Benefits -- Potential Harm -- The Natural Environment -- Potential Benefits -- Potential Harm -- Potential Social and Economic Harm -- Conclusion – References / 3. PERSPECTIVES -- Introduction -- Genetic Engineering in Agriculture: Uncertainties and Risks - Debal Deb; The Case for Teaching Food in Schools - Yussra MT Ebrahim; Improving Crops with CRISPR - Phill Jones; In the Know: Genetically Modified Foods - Rashmi Nemade; Genetically Modified Organisms - Tony Owen; GMO Foods in Developing Countries - Santosh Pandey; Labeling Bioengineered Foods: Theory vs. Reality - Ellen Rubin; Genetically Modified Crops in Africa: Fear of the Unknown? - Elizabeth Shoo; Accepting Genetically Modified Crops in India – Sweta; A Growing World Demands New Food Technology - Susan Young / 4. PROFILES – Introduction -- Biotechnology Regulatory Services Biotechnology Innovation Organization -- José Bové (1953-) -- Herbert Boyer (1936-) -- Canadian Biotechnology Action Network -- Center for Food Safety -- Emmanuelle Charpentier (1968-) -- Mary-Dell Chilton (1939-) -- Stanley N. Cohen (1935-) -- Crop Life International -- Jennifer Doudna (1964-) -- Food & Water Watch -- Robert T. Fraley (1953-) -- John E. Franz (1929-) -- Dennis Gonsalves (1943-) -- Greenpeace International -- International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications -- Steve Lindow (1951-) -- Mark Lynas (1973-) -- Monsanto (Bayer Crop Science) -- Non-GMO Project -- Ingo Potrykus (1933-) -- Maxine Singer (1931-) -- Marc van Montagu (1933-) -- World Health Organization / 5. DATA AND DOCUMENTS -- Introduction -- Data -- Table 5.1. Genetically Engineered Crops in the United States, 2000-19 (percent of all planted crop; all genetically engineered varieties) -- Table 5.2. Number of Releases of Genetically Engineered Organism Varieties Approved by APHIS, 1985-2013 -- Table 5.3. Total Number of GMO Crop Releases Approved by APHIS, to 2013 -- Table 5.4. Number of Releases Approved by APHIS by Genetic Trait, to 2013 -- Table 5.5. Prevalence of Bt IR and Stacked Gene Crops in U.S. Agriculture, 2000-19 (percentage of each crop) -- Documents -- Plant Patent Act of 1930 -- Diamond v. Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. 303 (1980) -- Coordinated Framework for the Regulation of Biotechnology (1986) -- Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (2000) -- Regulation of Genetically Modified Foods by the European Union (2003) -- Mendocino County (California) Ban on Genetically Modified Crops (2004/2019) -- The Safety of Genetically Modified Foods, GAO Report (2002) -- Invoking of Preemption (North Dakota, SB2277; 2005) -- Monsanto Co. v. Geertson Seed Farms, 561 U.S. 139 (2010) -- Bowman v. Monsanto, et al., 569 U.S. 11-796 (2013) -- National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (Public Law 114-216) (2016) -- National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (2018) -- Regulation of Gene-Editing Technology (2018) / 6. RESOURCES -- Books -- Articles -- Reports -- Internet Sources / 7. CHRONOLOGY – Glossary – Index.GMO Food: A Reference Handbook is intended to serve as a research guide for young adults in high school and beyond. Students at all grade levels should be able to use the book as an introduction to the history of genetic engineering of organisms and the use of this technology for the development of new forms of crops and foods.They will learn briefly about historic methods of plant and animal modification (such as cross-breeding) and, in more detail, how discoveries since the late nineteenth century have greatly changed the process of plant and animal modification. These discoveries include important steps forward in genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, genetic engineering, and related fields. They will also learn about the variety of social, political, philosophical, economic, and other issues that have arisen alongside these scientific advances, as well as about some of the laws, regulations, and other solutions that have been developed for dealing with the range of attitudes about genetically modified foods. The second edition covers developments since 2014. --Includes bibliographical references and index.
Subjects: Genetically modified foods.; Genetically modified foods; Genetically modified foods; Transgenic plants.; Food, Genetically Modified; Plants, Genetically Modified;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Agro-technology : a philosophical introduction / by Thompson, R. Paul,1947-;
"Humans have been modifying plants and animals for millennia. The dawn of molecular genetics, however, has kindled intense public scrutiny and controversy. Crops, and the food products which include them, have dominated molecular modification in agriculture. Organisations have made unsubstantiated claims and scare mongering is common. In this textbook Paul Thompson presents a clear account of the significant issues--identifying harms and benefits, analysing and managing risk--which lie beneath the cacophony of public controversy. His comprehensive analysis looks especially at genetically modified organisms, and includes an explanation of the scientific background, an analysis of ideological objections, a discussion of legal and ethical concerns, a suggested alternative--organic agriculture--and an examination of the controversy's impact on sub-Saharan African countries. His book will be of interest to students and other readers in philosophy, biology, biotechnology, and public policy"--"Although the current debate about agricultural biotechnology is often narrowly focused on molecular biotechnology (molecular genetic modification), the technological application of biology in agriculture predates the advent of molecular biology. For more than 10,000 years humans have been manipulating the traits of animals and plants (Mazoyer and Roundart, 2006; Thompson, 2009) by manipulating their genes and, thereby their genomes (the specific combination of genes in an organism's cells); the dog was likely the earliest animal to be domesticated (about 16,000 years ago). Early domestication of agricultural animals and plants was based entirely on crude experimentation (trial and error). Biological knowledge was elementary; humans learned early that offspring resemble parents, that selecting animals and plants with desirable traits and breeding them created a population of animals with those traits, and that occasionally a new trait seemed to appear"--Includes bibliographical references and index.Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Scientific background; 2. Application of genetics in agriculture; 3. Philosophical and conceptual background; 4. The controversy : ideological and theological objections; 5. The controversy : purported benefits; 6. The controversy : purported harms; 7. The organic alternative; 8. Impact on low and middle income countries : poverty, farming, and colonial legacies; Concluding remarks.
Subjects: Agricultural biotechnology; Genetic engineering; Agricultural biotechnology; Genetic engineering; Agricultural biotechnology; Genetic engineering;
© 2011., Cambridge University Press,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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DNA technology : a reference handbook / by Newton, David E.;
Includes bibliographical references and index.Background and history -- Problems, issues, and solutions -- Perspectives -- Profiles -- Data and documents.1. Background and history. Modifying life: the early history -- The birth of Genetics -- The road to DNA -- The structure of DNA -- The rise of molecular genetics -- Recombinant DNA technology -- Cloning-- Transgenic plants and animals -- Practical applications of transgenic organisms -- Gene therapy and genetic testing -- Forensic DNA testing -- Recent advances in DNA technology -- Conclusion -- References. ; 2. Problems, issues, and solutions. Forensic science -- Genetically modified organisms -- Xenotransplantation-- Pharming -- Genetic testing -- Genetic counseling -- Gene therapy -- Cloning -- The double-edged sword of CRISPR technology -- Conclusion --References. ; 3. Perspectives. Optogenetics / Arpita Dave -- Africans using autosomal DNA testing to find distant family members / LaKisha David --Mandatory GMO labeling is the "Right to be deceived" / Jon Entine --A brave new world for CRISPR/Cas9: Scientific limitations and ethical considerations / Rachele Hendricks-Sturrup -- Genome editing opens brave new world / Nerissa Hoglen -- Finding a face in the DNA / Clara MacCarald -- CRISPR controversies / Deirdre Manion-Fischer -- Modified DNA for targeted therapeutics / Manish Muhuri -- CRISPR and beyond - what the future holds for gene editing / Shelia T. Yong -- Forensic use of DNA technology / Jon Zonderman. ; 4. Profiles. Accreditation council for genetic counseling (ACGC) -- AgBioWorld-- American board of genetic counseling (ABGC) -- American society of bioethics and humanities (ASBH) -- American society of gene and cell therapy (ASGCT) --American society of human genetics (ASHG) -- W. French Anderson (1936-) -- Werner Arber (1929-) -- Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) --Association of Forensic DNA Analysts and Administrators (AFDAA) -- Oswald Avery (1877-1955) -- Paul Berg (1926-) -- Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO) -- Biotechnology Regulatory Services (BRS) -- Herbert Boyer (1936-) -- California Certified Organic Farmer (CCOF) -- Center for bioethics and human dignity (CBHD) -- Center for food safety (CFS) -- Center for genetics and society (CGS)-- Center for genomics and public health (CGPH) -- Erwin Chargaff (1905-2002) -- Emmanuelle Charpentier (1968-) -- Mary-Dell Chilton (1939-) -- Coalition for genetic fairness (CGF) -- Stanley N. Cohen (1935-) -- Council for responsible genetics (CRG) -- Francis Crick (1916-2004) -- Karl Deisseroth (1971-) -- Jennifer Doudna (1964-) -- European NGO Network on Genetic Engineering (GENET) -- Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) -- Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) --Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) -- Genetic Alliance -- Greenpeace -- Woo-suk Hwang (1953-) -- Innocence Project -- Institute for Responsible Technology (IRT) -- International Bioethics Committee (IBC) -- International Biopharmaceutical Association (IBPA) -- International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB) -- Sir Alec Jeffreys (1950-) -- Gregor Mendel (1822-1884) -- Johannes Friedrich Miescher (1844-1895) -- Juan Francisco Martinez Mojica (1963-) -- Kary Mullis (1944-) -- National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) -- National Society of Genetics Counselors (NSGC) -- Marshall Nirenberg (1927-2010) -- Non-GMO Project -- Northwest Resistance against Genetic Engineering (NW RAGE) -- Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) -- Office of Public Health Genomics (OPHG) -- Organic Consumers Association (OCA) -- Ingo Potrykus (1933-) -- Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues -- Hamilton O. Smith (1931-) -- Robert A. Swanson (1947-1999) -- DizhouTong (1902-1979) -- Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) -- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) -- U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) -- J. Craig Venter (1946-) -- James Watson (1928-). ; 5. Data and Documents. Data: Table 5.1 Adoption of genetically engineered crops in the United States, 1996-2015 -- Table 5.2 Types of genetically engineered corn and cotton in the United States, 2000-2015 -- Table 5.3 Number of releases, sites, and constructs authorized by APHIS for evaluation -- Table 5.4 Number of releases approved by APHIS by gene trait, to September 2013 -- Table 5.6 Institutions with greatestnumber of APHIS permits for genetically engineered crops, to September 2013 --Table 5.4 CODIS Statistics for 15 top states as of February 2016 -- Documents: Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals Inc. (1993) -- Executive order 13145 (2000) -- Regulations with respect to genetically modified foods: European Union (2003) -- Alaska state law on genetic privacy (2004) - Post-conviction DNA testing (2004) -- United Nations declaration on human cloning (2005) --Additional protocol to the convention on human rights and biomedicine,concerning genetic testing for health purposes (2008) -- Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (2008) -- Vermont Act 120 (GM food labeling) (2014) --Rule 702. Federal rules of evidence (2015) -- Grocery Manufacturers Association,et al, v. William H. Sorrell, et al. Case No. 5: 14cv-117 (2015) -- People v.Collins, NY Slip Op 25227 [49 Misc 3d 595] (2015) -- Collection and use of DNA identification information from certain federal offenders 42 U.S. Code ʹ14135a (2016) -- Issues of DNA Collection: Maryland v. King 569 U.S.___ -- State v. Medina, et al. 2014 VT 69 (2014)."DNA technology: a reference handbook provides an up-to-date historical overview and general technical background to the topic as well as a broad introduction to current issues related to the development of DNA technology, such as genetically modified organisms, the use of DNA technology in the forensic sciences, and genetic testing and genetic therapy. Written by David E. Newton, an author and former teacher who has dedicated a lifetime to authoring educational texts on science and technology, this book examines the history of DNA technology from its discovery in the 1950s to the present day and covers recent advances, such as new methods for gene editing, including CRISP-Cas9 technology. Readers need to have little or no background knowledge of the technology of genetic engineering to improve their understanding of DNA-based technologies and how DNA research influences many current issues and debates in agriculture, food science, forensics, public health, and other fields. The single-volume work is particularly well-suited to students and young adults because of the range of references included that serve further study, such as a glossary of terms, a chronology, and an extensive annotated bibliography"--Publisher's website.
Subjects: Genetic engineering; Genetic Techniques.; DNA.; Biotechnology.; Genetics.;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Consciousness : confessions of a romantic reductionist / by Koch, Christof,1956-;
Includes bibliographical references and index.In which I introduce the ancient mind-body problem, explain why I am on a quest to use reason and empirical inquiry to solve it, acquaint you with Francis Crick, explain how he relates to this quest, make a confession, and end on a sad note -- In which I write about the wellsprings of my inner conflict between religion and reason, why I grew up wanting to be a scientist, why I wear a lapel pin of Professor Calculus, and how I acquired a second mentor late in life -- In which I explain why consciousness challenges the scientific view of the world, how consciousness can be investigated empirically with both feet firmly planted on the ground, why animals share consciousness with humans, and why self-consciousness is not as important as many people think it is -- In which you hear tales of scientist-magicians that make you look but not see, how they track the footprints of consciousness by peering into your skull, why you don't see with your eyes, and why attention and consciousness are not the same -- In which you learn from neurologists and neurosurgeons that some neurons care a great deal about celebrities, that cutting the cerebral cortex in two does not reduce consciousness by half, that color is leached from the world by the loss of a small cortical region, and that the destruction of a sugar cube-sized chunk of brain stem or thalamic tissue leaves you undead -- In which I defend two propositions that my younger self found nonsense -- you are unaware of most of the things that go on in your head, and zombie agents control much of your life, even though you confidently believe that you are in charge -- In which I throw caution to the wind, bring up free will, Der ring des Nibelungen, and what physics says about determinism, explain the impoverished ability of your mind to choose, show that your will lags behind your brain's decision, and that freedom is just another word for feeling -- In which I argue that consciousness is a fundamental property of complex things, rhapsodize about integrated information theory, how it explains many puzzling facts about consciousness and provides a blueprint for building sentient machines -- In which I outline an electromagnetic gadget to measure consciousness, describe efforts to harness the power of genetic engineering to track consciousness in mice, and find myself building cortical observatories -- In which I muse about final matters considered off-limits to polite scientific discourse: to wit, the relationship between science and religion, the existence of God, whether this God can intervene in the universe, the death of my mentor, and my recent tribulations.What links conscious experience of pain, joy, color, and smell to bioelectrical activity in the brain? How can anything physical give rise to nonphysical, subjective, conscious states? Christof Koch has devoted much of his career to bridging the seemingly unbridgeable gap between the physics of the brain and phenomenal experience. This engaging book--part scientific overview, part memoir, part futurist speculation--describes Koch's search for an empirical explanation for consciousness. Koch recounts not only the birth of the modern science of consciousness but also the subterranean motivation for his quest--his instinctual (if "romantic") belief that life is meaningful. Koch describes his own groundbreaking work with Francis Crick in the 1990s and 2000s and the gradual emergence of consciousness (once considered a "fringy" subject) as a legitimate topic for scientific investigation. Present at this paradigm shift were Koch and a handful of colleagues, including Ned Block, David Chalmers, Stanislas Dehaene, Giulio Tononi, Wolf Singer, and others. Aiding and abetting it were new techniques to listen in on the activity of individual nerve cells, clinical studies, and brain-imaging technologies that allowed safe and noninvasive study of the human brain in action. Koch gives us stories from the front lines of modern research into the neurobiology of consciousness as well as his own reflections on a variety of topics, including the distinction between attention and awareness, the unconscious, how neurons respond to Homer Simpson, the physics and biology of free will, dogs, Der Ring des Nibelungen, sentient machines, the loss of his belief in a personal God, and sadness. All of them are signposts in the pursuit of his life's work--to uncover the roots of consciousness.
Subjects: Consciousness.; Mind and body.; Free will and determinism.; Life.; Consciousness.; Mind-Body Relations, Metaphysical.; Personal Autonomy.; Life.; Existentialism.;
© c2012., MIT Press,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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