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Contemplative caregiving : finding healing, compassion, and spiritual growth through end-of-life care / by Baugher, John E.,author.;
Includes bibliographical references (pages 199-206) and index.From Anglican prayer to secular mindfulness : the origins and practice of contemplative end-of-life care -- Caregiving as spiritual practice -- Becoming a contemplative caregiver -- Transforming our grief through compassionate care -- The reciprocity of care -- Flexible mind, caring mind -- Caring with a playful spirit -- Offering spiritual friendship -- Healing ourselves, healing our world -- Compassion unbound."After author John Baugher's mother was murdered in 1987, he felt that he was fated to join her killer in life imprisonment--not behind bars, but behind psychological walls of unresolved grief and anger. Baugher turned to hospice volunteering as a way to channel his experience, marking the beginning of a twenty-five year journey of exploration--in both public hospices and prison hospice programs--and the possibility of discovering compassion and even humor in the face of death. In this beautifully written book, Baugher weaves together insights from his experience with those gleaned from interviews with dozens of hospice volunteers from widely varying backgrounds. "Caring for others at the end of life has shown me that affirming the humanity of others is crucial to my own joy and sense of vibrancy," writes Baugher. Contemplative caregiving can be a spiritual practice in its own right--a practice that parallels the benefits of mindfulness while extending them beyond the personal level to inspire compassionate shifts in families, hospitals, and broader spheres of society." --
Subjects: Hospice care.; Caregivers.; Compassion.; Contemplation.; Spiritual life.; Hospice Care; Caregivers; Terminal Care; Spirituality.; Empathy.;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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The good caregiver : a one-of-a-kind compassionate resource for anyone caring for an aging loved one / by Kane, Robert L.,1940-; Ouellette, Jeannine.;
Includes bibliographical references and index.Becoming a caregiver -- Money and the law -- Finding a good doctor -- Caring for yourself -- Daily life -- Common ailments and treatments -- The aging brain -- Handling hospitals -- Send help! -- Moving time -- Nursing homes -- End of life -- Political advocacy.Offers those caring for an aging loved one practical advice to help them cope with the day-to-day challenges they might face.
Subjects: Popular Works.; Older people; Caregivers.; Caregivers.; Aging.; Geriatrics.; Health Services for the Aged.; Aged.; Family.;
© ©2011., Avery,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Caregiving, carebots, and contagion / by Brannigan, Michael C.,1948-author.;
Includes bibliographical references (pages 121-131) and index.Introduction: Then, now, and to come -- Are robots made for this? -- Promise -- Peril -- What is in a face? -- Poise."Would you want to be cared for by a robot? Michael C. Brannigan's Caregiving, Carebots, and Contagion explores caring robots' lifesaving benefits, particularly during contagion, while probing the threat they pose to interpersonal engagement and genuine human caregiving. As our COVID-19 purgatory lingers on, caring robots will join our nursing and healthcare frontlines. Carebots can perform lifesaving tasks to minimize infection, safeguard vulnerable persons, and relieve caregivers of certain burdens. They also spark profound moral and existential questions: What is caring? How will we relate with each other? What does it mean to be human? Underscoring carebots' hands-on benefits, Brannigan also warns us of perils. They can be a dangerous lure in a culture that settles for substitutes and venerates the screen. Alerting us to the threatening prospect of carebots becoming our surrogate for interpersonal connection, he maintains they are not the culprits. The challenge lies in how we relate to them. While they beneficially complement our caregiving, carebots cannot replace human caring. Caring is a fundamentally human act and lies at the heart of ethics. As humans, we have a binding moral responsibility to care for the Other, and genuine caring demands our embodied, human-to-human presence"--
Subjects: Robotics in medicine.; Human-robot interaction.; Home care services.; Communicable diseases; Robotics.; Robotics; Home Care Services; Communicable Diseases;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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The dementia caregiver : a guide to caring for someone with Alzheimer's Disease and other neurocognitive disorders / by Agronin, Marc E.;
Includes bibliographical references and index.Normal and abnormal cognitive changes -- Seeking an answer : state-of-the-art evaluation -- The spectrum of neurocognitive disorders -- Alzheimer's disease -- Vascular dementia -- Frontotemporal dementia -- Dementia with Lewy bodies -- Medical causes of neurocognitive disorders -- Caregiving during mild stages -- Caregiving during moderate stages -- Caregiving during advanced stages -- Depression, anxiety, sleep problems, and apathy -- Agitation and psychosis -- Dealing with common medical issues -- Caring for the caregiver -- Legal issues -- Long-term care -- Resources.Becoming a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer's disease or another neurocognitive disorder can be an unexpected, undesirable, underappreciated--and yet noble--role. It is heartbreaking to watch someone lose the very cognitive capacities that once helped to define them as a person. But because of the nature of these disorders, the only way to become an effective caregiver and cope with the role's many daily challenges is to become well-informed about the disease. With the right information, resources and tips on caregiving and working with professionals, you can become your own expert at both caring for your charge and taking care of yourself. In these pages, the author guides readers to a better understanding of the changes their loved one may be going through and helps them tap into the various resources available to them as they embark on an uncertain caregiving journey.--Publisher description.
Subjects: Handbooks and manuals.; Dementia; Dementia; Caregivers;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Passages in caregiving : turning chaos into confidence / by Sheehy, Gail.;
Includes bibliographical references and index.The making of a caregiver -- The call -- Why didn't we talk about this before? -- The inner pilgrimage -- Tag, you're it! -- First turning : shock and mobilization -- How we mobilize -- What to do about Mom and Dad? -- Second turning : the new normal -- Seeking a new dream -- The education of a fearless caregiving family -- Sibling wars -- Third turning : boomerang -- When it comes back -- Chasing the tiger -- Sandwiched! -- Fourth turning : playng God -- The whole world in my hands -- Taking clay to Monet -- Guess what, we're not God! -- When a couple is divided by dementia -- Fifth turning : "I can't do this anymore!" -- Traumatic transitions -- Ready to explode -- Mind jobs : caring of a loved one with cognitive decline -- Cognitive comeback : a creative breakthrough -- Sixth turning : coming back -- Breaking down, breaking through -- Caring for the unloved one -- Seventh turning : the inbetween stage -- Beyond cure, what now? -- Coming home -- The new Latina model -- Eighth turning : the long good-bye -- The crucial choice -- Finding the "why?" to live -- Moments of presence -- Crossing the Rubicon -- Epilogue : Who will take care of us? -- From crisis to closure.No one really expects it, but at some time or another, just about everyone has been--or will be--responsible for giving care, for a sustained period, to someone close to them. Gail Sheehy, who has chronicled every major turning point for twentieth-century Americans, as well as reported on everything from politics to sexuality, knows firsthand the trials, fears, and rare joys of caregiving. Here, she takes you by the hand and shows you that you will get through this, and you will do the right things. Sheehy identifies eight crucial stages of caregiving and offers insight for successfully navigating each one. Most important, however, she points out that you don't have to be alone in this process. This book can help turn a stressful, life-altering situation into a journey that can be safely navigated and from which everyone can benefit.--From publisher description.
Subjects: Caregivers.; Chronically ill; Chronically ill; Home nursing.; Chronic Disease; Family Relations.;
© c2010., HarperCollins,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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The caregiver's companion : caring for your loved one medically, financially and emotionally while caring for yourself / by Brent, Carolyn.;
Includes bibliographical references and index."Everything you need to know to ensure that your elderly loved one is being properly cared for. People today are not only living longer, they are also living sicker-making aging and caring for elderly loved ones more complicated than ever before. In this extensive guide, caregiver advocate Carolyn Brent outlines a step-by-step process so caregivers know what to do and what to ask in every situation that may arise, including: [bullet] Signs that your loved one needs more assistance [bullet] What to look for in a retirement home [bullet] Caretaking in your own home [bullet] How to ensure wills are in order [bullet] How to manage difficult family relationships [bullet] Ensuring you are getting the help and care you need Brent leaves no stone unturned, provides personal stories and scenarios for context, and includes other references and resources in this complete guide to caregiving"--"A comprehensive, straightforward handbook to help family caregivers with sibling and parent-child communication, end-of-life decision making, and guidance for how to help a loved one medically, financially, and emotionally"--
Subjects: Home care services; Caregivers;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Being a caregiver in a home setting / by Zucker, Elana D.,1941-;
Providing care in the home -- Communication skills -- Working with people -- Caring for an elderly person -- Working with children -- Care of the dying in the home -- Infection control in the home -- Care of a person's environment -- Planning, purchasing, and serving food -- Basic body movement and positions -- Skin care -- Personal care -- Rehabilitation of the individual receiving care at home -- Vital signs -- Preventing fluid overload and dehydration -- Specimen collection -- Special procedures -- Common diseases -- Emergency procedures.
Subjects: Home care services.; Caregivers.; Home health aides.; Home Nursing;
© c2013., Pearson,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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The unexpected journey of caring : the transformation from loved one to caregiver / by Thomson, Donna,1955-; White, Zachary,author.; Woodruff, Judy,writer of foreword.;
Includes bibliographical references (pages 231-239) and index.I'm (not) a caregiver -- Disorientation : from loved one to caregiver -- Living in-between scripts -- A hyper-intolerance of others -- Audience betrayal -- Who am I becoming and why am I so hard on myself? -- When 'getting through' isn't good enough -- Re-orientation and advocacy -- Making meaning that matters now -- Begin with the basics : what is my role at home, what do I want it to be? -- It takes a village : revealing hidden assets in neighborhood -- Navigating the rough waters of transition -- Not a social network, but a care network -- How to know what you want and get what you need -- Power and love = empowerment -- Cultivating connection.Caregivers today find themselves in need of a crash course in new and unfamiliar skills. They must not only care for a loved one, but also access hidden community resources, collaborate with medical professionals, craft new narratives consistent with the changing nature of their care role, coordinate care with family, seek information and peer support using a variety of digital platforms, and negotiate social support--all while attempting to manage conflicts between work, life, and relationship roles. The moments that mark us in the transition from loved one to caregiver matter because if we don't make sense of how we are being transformed, we risk undervaluing our care experiences, denying our evolving beliefs, becoming trapped by other's misunderstandings, and feeling underappreciated, burned out, and overwhelmed. Informed by original caregiver research and proven advocacy strategies, this book speaks to caregiving as it unfolds, in all of its confusion, chaos, and messiness. Readers won't find well-intentioned clichés or care stereotypes in this book. There are no promises to help caregivers return to a life they knew before caregiving. No, this book greets caregivers where they are in their journey--new or chronic--not where others expect (or want) them to be.
Subjects: Caregivers; Caregivers; Caregivers; Home Nursing; Social Support.;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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Alzheimer's early stages : first steps for family, friends and caregivers / by Kuhn, Daniel.;
Includes bibliographical references (pages 264-284) and index.Part I: What Is Alzheimer's Disease? -- The Need for an Accurate Diagnosis: What Is Normal and Abnormal in the Brain? -- What About Genetic Testing? -- How Alzheimer's Disease Changes the Brain -- Getting an Accurate Diagnosis -- The Value of a Diagnosis -- Disclosing the Diagnosis -- Symptoms of the Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease: What Is Recent Memory? -- Beginning Signs -- An Emerging Pattern -- Other Troubling Symptoms -- One or More Symptoms Sometimes Present -- Noncognitive or Behavioral Changes -- Take Action -- Treatment and Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease: Current Treatments -- Progress in Treatment -- Participating in Clinical Drug Trials and Other Studies -- Toward Prevention -- The Limits of Medicine -- A Good Quality Life: What is a Good Life? -- Relative Well-Being -- Wholeness -- Part II: Giving Care -- What Is It Like to Have Alzheimer's Disease?: Some Common Experiences and Feelings -- Varying Degrees of Awareness of Symptoms -- The Importance of Social Environment -- What Do People with AD Really Need? -- What Some Family Members Have to Say -- How Relationships, Roles, and Responsibilities Change: Accepting the Diagnosis -- Stepping into the Leadership Role -- When Your Partner Has AD -- When Your Parent Has AD -- What About Kids? -- Telling Others About the Diagnosis -- The Reactions of Others -- Making Practical Decisions: Ensuring Safety on the Road -- Maintaining Good Health -- Other Safety Considerations -- Ensuring Financial Well-Being -- Alternative Living Situations for the Person with AD -- Doing the Right Thing -- Improving Communication: Communication Difficulties -- Redefining Your Relationship -- Ways of Listening to and Talking with a Person with AD -- Whose Problem Is It? -- Helping a Person with Alzheimer's Disease Plan for the Future: Finding the Time -- Legal Considerations -- Financing the Cost of Care -- Rethinking the Living Situation -- Finding the Right Professionals -- Keeping a Person with Alzheimer's Disease Active: Involving Others -- Dealing With Depression -- Selecting Appropriate Activities -- The Importance of Everyday Activities -- Intellectual Activities -- Traveling -- Participating in Social Events -- Reminiscing -- Spiritual and Religious Practices -- Helping the Person with AD Maintain Physical Health -- Support Groups -- Activity Programs -- Pets and Plants -- Part III: Caring for Yourself: Self-Renewal for Family and Friends -- Attitude Matters -- Listening to Your Body and Mind -- The Importance of Grief -- Individual and Family Counseling -- Exploring Spiritual Resources -- Keeping a Journal -- Maintaining a Sense of Humor -- Obtaining the Help You May Need: Enlisting Help -- Participating in a Support Group -- Using Help at Home -- Choosing an Adult Day Center -- The National Family Caregiver Support Program -- Learning More About AD -- Voices of Experience: Questions and Answers -- Lessons Learned -- Epilogue: Advocating for Change: The Politics of Health Care -- The Role of Government -- The Role of the Private Sector -- AD Research Centers in the United States Funded by the National Institute on Aging -- Print and Video Resources -- Resources on the Web.This third edition of Alzheimer's Early Stages offers the 5 million individuals diagnosed with the disease and their loved ones and caretakers new research findings, new approaches to treatment, and new information on the three key areas of Alzheimer's disease: medical aspects, day-to-day care, and care for the caretaker. Author Daniel Kuhn has been a social worker and educator focused on enhancing the well-being of people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, as well as that of their families, since 1987. Alzheimer's disease has a beginning, not just an end; and as with all beginnings, one must take the first steps before one takes the last. The problems encountered early in the disease and the advice required then are very different from what is needed later in the disease. This book enlightens us about these early stages. Daniel Kuhn seeks to replace fear with knowledge, in the hope that knowledge will lead to empowerment. What does the disease look like and feel like when it first occurs? What types of problems are encountered first by the person with the disease, and by their family and friends? How can these problems be dealt with most effectively? This book is also about reversing the dehumanization that unfortunately is now associated with Alzheimer's disease. Although the disease should be feared and respected, it is not a cause for embarrassment or shame ... This book will serve as a discussion tool to encourage open and frank discussions about mild Alzheimer's disease among patients and family members. In Part One, readers learn about the medical aspects of Alzheimer's through descriptions of diagnosis and the progression of the disease from its earliest origins, and explanations of the current and proposed medical treatments. This section also describes potential non-drug means of treating the disease, such as physical exercise, and speculative treatments, such as coconut oil, that are gaining popularity yet are not.
Subjects: Alzheimer's disease; Caregivers.; Alzheimer Disease.; Caregivers.;
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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A bittersweet season : caring for our aging parents-- and ourselves / by Gross, Jane.;
The early heroic rush -- The myth of assisted living -- The vestiges of family medicine -- A job for professionals -- The best doctors money can buy -- September eleventh -- September twelfth -- The biology, sociology, and psychology of aging -- A nursing home thanksgiving -- The Make-A-Wish Foundation -- Follow the money -- Therapeutic fibs -- Cruel sorting -- As complicated as a Rubik's cube -- The time for talking -- N-O-W -- Dying days -- Orphans.In telling the warmhearted story of caring for her own aged and ailing mother, "New York Times" journalist Gross offers indispensable advice on virtually every aspect of elder care.
Subjects: Aging parents; Adult children of aging parents; Gross, Jane; Caregivers; Caregivers.; Caregivers; Parent-Child Relations;
© 2011., Alfred A. Knopf,
Available copies: 1 / Total copies: 1
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