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  • 1 of 1 copy available at Kirtland Community College. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Kirtland Community College Library.

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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Kirtland Community College Library E 628 .R63 2003 30775305518046 General Collection Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 0826214649
  • ISBN: 9780826214645
  • Physical Description: xi, 245 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Publisher: Columbia : University of Missouri Press, ©2003.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 217-237) and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
When I am grown : the Southern belle in Mississippi and Louisiana -- The trumpet of war is sounding : young ladies respond to the cause -- Keeping house : the Southern belle in the Confederate household -- The Confederate belle -- How has the mighty fallen : defeat in Mississippi and Louisiana -- The Yankees are coming -- Our slaves are gone -- The Confederate belle in defeat, 1865-1870.
Summary, etc.:
"While historians have examined the struggles and challenges that confronted the Southern plantation mistress during the American Civil War, until now no one has considered the ways in which the conflict shaped the lives of elite young women, otherwise known as belles. In The Confederate Belle, Giselle Roberts uses diaries, letters, and memoirs to uncover the unique wartime experiences of young ladies in Mississippi and Louisiana. In the plantation culture of the antebellum South, belles enhanced their family's status through their appearance and accomplishments and, later, by marrying well." "During the American Civil War, a new patriotic womanhood superseded the antebellum feminine ideal. It demanded that Confederate women sacrifice everything for their beloved cause, including their men, homes, fine dresses, and social occasions, to ensure the establishment of a new nation and the preservation of elite ideas about race, class, and gender. As menfolk answered the call to arms, southern matrons had to redefine their roles as mistresses and wives. Southern belles faced a different, yet equally daunting task. After being prepared for a delightful "bellehood," young ladies were forced to reassess their traditional rite of passage into womanhood, to compromise their understanding of femininity at a pivotal time in their lives. They found themselves caught between antebellum traditions of honor and of gentility, a binary patriotic feminine ideal and wartime reality."--Jacket.
Subject: United States > History > Civil War, 1861-1865 > Women.
United States > History > Civil War, 1861-1865 > Social aspects.
Mississippi > History > Civil War, 1861-1865 > Women.
Mississippi > History > Civil War, 1861-1865 > Social aspects.
Louisiana > History > Civil War, 1861-1865 > Women.
Louisiana > History > Civil War, 1861-1865 > Social aspects.
Women, White > Confederate States of America > Social conditions.
Elite (Social sciences) > Confederate States of America > History.
Confederate States of America > Social conditions.
Southern States > Social conditions > 19th century.

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