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All the daring of the soldier : women of the Civil War armies / Elizabeth D. Leonard.

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at Kirtland Community College.

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Kirtland Community College Library E 628 .L46 1999 30775305505258 General Collection Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 0393047121
  • ISBN: 9780393047127
  • ISBN: 039333547X
  • ISBN: 9780393335477
  • Physical Description: 368 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Edition: 1st ed.
  • Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton & Co., ©1999.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 343-359) and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
ch. 1. "The ladies were terrific" : a handful of Civil War women spies -- ch. 2. "The women are the worst of all" : the broad scope of female espionage and resistance during the Civil War -- ch. 3. Half-soldier heroines : a handful of Civil War Army women and their predecessors -- ch. 4. As brave as a lion and as pretty as a lamb : more Civil War Army women, real and fictional -- ch. 5. The beardless boy was a universal favorite : Deborah Sampson and a handful of Civil War women soldiers -- ch. 6. To don the breeches, and slay them with a will! : a host of women soldiers -- ch. 7. A devoted worker for her cause : the question of motivation.
Summary, etc.:
These are the stories of the women who worked as spies, as daughters of the regiments, or, disguised, as male soldiers to play their heroic part in the Civil War. Here are the stories of Belle Boyd, a proud Confederate loyalist and key player in Stonewall Jackson's struggle to hold the Shenandoah Valley, army woman Annie Etheridge, whose four long years of courageous work on the field earned her a Kearney Cross for bravery, Sarah Emma Edmonds, who enlisted as "Franklin Thompson," remained with her regiment as a much respected soldier for two years, and fought at Fredricksburg and elsewhere; and many other courageous women.
Subject: United States > History > Civil War, 1861-1865 > Women.
United States. Army > Women.
Confederate States of America. Army > Women.
Women soldiers > United States > History > 19th century.
Women spies > United States > History > 19th century.

Syndetic Solutions - CHOICE_Magazine Review for ISBN Number 0393047121
All the Daring of the Soldier : Women of the Civil War Armies
All the Daring of the Soldier : Women of the Civil War Armies
by Leonard, Elizabeth D.
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CHOICE_Magazine Review

All the Daring of the Soldier : Women of the Civil War Armies

CHOICE


Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.

Using a wide variety of fragmentary, fugitive, and contradictory sources, Leonard has pulled together in one account a history of women associated with the Union and Confederate armies in the field during the Civil War. She excludes women who served as nurses and physicians. Successive chapters discuss women spies, major and minor; so-called daughters of the regiment; and those who enlisted in disguise as men. Even when dealing with the last category the author pays little attention to problematic questions of gender identity. Admitting patriotism and romantic attachment as motivation in some cases, Leonard points out that most of the army women were working class. For them the military offered attractive economic incentives. The book's detail and prose is colorful enough to satisfy the enthusiast looking for good stories and restrained enough to satisfy those wary of sensationalism. If the book offers few surprises, its comprehensiveness will remind scholars of the range of women's involvement in the war, and will provide grist for undergraduate mills. All levels. A. Graebner; College of St. Catherine

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 0393047121
All the Daring of the Soldier : Women of the Civil War Armies
All the Daring of the Soldier : Women of the Civil War Armies
by Leonard, Elizabeth D.
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Publishers Weekly Review

All the Daring of the Soldier : Women of the Civil War Armies

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

At the core of this well-researched investigation into the role of women in the Civil War armies is a sensitivity to the plight of Victorian-era women. Leonard (Yankee Women) notes that "domestic service continued in the late nineteenth century to represent the primary waged occupation for women." It's no wonder, then, that a few intrepid women decided that the war offered them a better chance to be all that they could be. A Colby College history professor, Leonard has plowed through archives to bring readers the stories of dozens of women who served in both the Union and Confederacy during the Civil War. Some were spies, but many more adopted men's names, dressed in men's clothes and lived and fought and died alongside mostly unsuspecting men. One Union general "became outraged when an unnamed sergeant under his command `was delivered of a baby,' which, he irately noted `is in violation of all military law and of the army regulations.'" Often, when women were discovered in the ranks, they were accused of being clever prostitutes who enlisted because of the promise of steady business. Leonard dismisses this theory, noting that there was hardly a need for prostitutes to go incognito. Leonard's engaging portraits of these female soldiers are neatly contextualized, and she makes it clear that women enlisted because they were patriots, because they wanted to be near husbands and brothers and, perhaps above all, because they felt the war offered them a chance at autonomy and adventure. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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