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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Kirtland Community College Library BF 408 .T56 2015 30775305503113 General Collection Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780300195880 (hardback)
  • ISBN: 0300195885 (hardback)
  • Physical Description: print
    ix, 310 pages ; 22 cm
  • Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, [2015]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 269-287) and index.
Formatted Contents Note: Introduction: Down we go together -- When culture works -- Disappearing clerks and the lost sense of place -- Of permatemps and content serfs -- Indie Rock's endless road -- The architecture meltdown -- Idle dreamers: curse of the creative class -- The end of print -- Self-inflicted wounds -- Lost in the supermarket: winner-take-all -- Epilogue: Restoring the middle.
Summary, etc.: "Change is no stranger to us in the twenty-first century. All of us must constantly adjust to an evolving world, to transformation and innovation. But for many thousands of creative artists, a torrent of recent changes has made it all but impossible to earn a living. A persistent economic recession, social shifts, and technological change have combined to put our artists-from graphic designers to indie-rock musicians, from architects to booksellers-out of work. This important book looks deeply and broadly into the roots of the crisis of the creative class in America and tells us why it matters. Scott Timberg considers the human cost as well as the unintended consequences of shuttered record stores, decimated newspapers, music piracy, and a general attitude of indifference. He identifies social tensions and contradictions-most concerning the artist's place in society-that have plunged the creative class into a fight for survival. Timberg shows how America's now-collapsing middlebrow culture-a culture once derided by intellectuals like Dwight Macdonald-appears, from today's vantage point, to have been at least a Silver Age. Timberg's reporting is essential reading for anyone who works in the world of culture, knows someone who does, or cares about the work creative artists produce"--
Subject: Creative ability United States History 21st century
Social classes United States History 21st century
Social change United States History 21st century
Popular culture United States History 21st century
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