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Capital dames : the Civil War and the women of Washington, 1848-1868 / Cokie Roberts.

Roberts, Cokie. (Author).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at Kirtland Community College.

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Kirtland Community College Library E 628 .R634 2015 30775305490485 General Collection Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780062002761
  • ISBN: 0062002767
  • Physical Description: x, 494 pages : illustrations, maps, portraits ; 24 cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York, NY : Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, [2015]

Content descriptions

General Note:
Map on lining papers.
Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 423-492).
Formatted Contents Note:
Meet the women of Washington, 1848-1856 -- Jessie runs for president but Harriet takes the White House and Mary Jane reports, 1856-1858 -- Varina leads and leaves as Abby drops by, 1859-1861 -- Rose goes to jail, Jessie goes to the White House, Dorothea goes to work, 1861 -- Rose is released, Clara goes to war, Louisa May briefly nurses, 1862 -- Lizzie reports on the action, Janet goes to camp, Louisa takes charge, 1863 -- Anna speaks, Jessie campaigns (again), Sojourner visits, 1864 -- One Mary leaves, one Mary hangs, and Lois writes about it all, 1865 -- Virginia and Varina return, Sara survives, Mary is humiliated, Kate loses, 1866-1868.
Summary, etc.:
With the outbreak of the Civil War, the small, social Southern town of Washington, D.C. found itself caught between warring sides in a four-year battle that would determine the future of the United States. After the declaration of secession, many fascinating Southern women left the city, leaving their friends -- such as Adele Cutts Douglas and Elizabeth Blair Lee -- to grapple with questions of safety and sanitation as the capital was transformed into an immense Union army camp and later a hospital. With their husbands, brothers, and fathers marching off to war, either on the battlefield or in the halls of Congress, the women of Washington joined the cause as well. And more women went to the Capital City to enlist as nurses, supply organizers, relief workers, and journalists. Many risked their lives making munitions in a highly flammable arsenal, toiled at the Treasury Department printing greenbacks to finance the war, and plied their needlework skills at The Navy Yard -- once the sole province of men -- to sew canvas gunpowder bags for the troops. Sifting through newspaper articles, government records, and private letters and diaries -- many never before published -- Roberts brings the war-torn capital into focus through the lives of its formidable women.
Subject: United States > History > Civil War, 1861-1865 > Women.
Washington (D.C.) > History > Civil War, 1861-1865.
United States > History > Civil War, 1861-1865 > Biography.
Women > Washington (D.C.) > Biography.
Politicians' spouses > Washington (D.C.) > Biography.
Women > Political activity > United States > History > 19th century.
United States > History > 1815-1861 > Biography.
Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) > Biography.
Women > United States > History > 19th century.

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