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The Bill of Rights : the fight to secure America's liberties

Berkin, Carol. (Author).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at Kirtland Community College.

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0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Kirtland Community College Library KF 4749 .B47 2015 30775305493539 General Collection Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781476743790
  • ISBN: 1476743797
  • ISBN: 9781476743813
  • ISBN: 1476743819
  • ISBN: 9781476743806 (pbk. : alk. paper)
  • ISBN: 1476743800 (pbk. : alk. paper)
  • Physical Description: print
    259 pages ; 24 cm
  • Edition: First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition.
  • Publisher: New York, NY : Simon & Schuster, 2015.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Summary, etc.: Describes how the Bill of Rights came into existence, detailing how the Founders argued over the contents of the document, reflecting an ideological divide between the power of the federal versus state governments that still exists to this day.
Subject: United States. 1st-10th Amendments.
Civil rights United States History
Constitutional history United States
Madison, James 1751-1836

Syndetic Solutions - Library Journal Review for ISBN Number 9781476743790
The Bill of Rights : The Fight to Secure America's Liberties
The Bill of Rights : The Fight to Secure America's Liberties
by Berkin, Carol
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Library Journal Review

The Bill of Rights : The Fight to Secure America's Liberties

Library Journal


(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

The Constitutional Convention that met in Philadelphia in 1787 was supposed to propose reforms to the Articles of Confederation. Instead attendees wrote an entirely new document. Berkin (history, Baruch Coll.; A Brilliant Solution) tells the story of the Bill of Rights in the Convention, the ratification in the states, and in the First Congress. Those who opposed the ratification of the Constitution cited the lack of a bill of rights to limit the powers of the proposed federal government. James Madison, a key figure in the Convention, opposed such an addition. But Madison agreed to support one in order to appease the opponents of the Constitution. Madison, elected to the First Congress in order to manage the amendment process, was key to the drafting and adoption of the first ten amendments to the Constitution. Berkin is a talented writer, and her story moves swiftly. The book also includes a biographical section profiling all those involved. VERDICT A scholarly and readable book that is excellent for history buffs. [See Prepub Alert, 11/17/14.]-Michael O. Eshleman, -Bloomington, IN © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 9781476743790
The Bill of Rights : The Fight to Secure America's Liberties
The Bill of Rights : The Fight to Secure America's Liberties
by Berkin, Carol
Rate this title:
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Publishers Weekly Review

The Bill of Rights : The Fight to Secure America's Liberties

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Berkin (Wondrous Beauty), a professor of history at Baruch College and the CUNY Graduate Center, provides a narrative history of two critical constitutional moments in American history: the introduction and adoption by the first federal Congress of the Bill of Rights and the Bill's rapid ratification by the states. She tells the story briskly, working from comprehensive sources, and she omits nothing of importance. The problem is that Berkin leaves it at that, assuming that a story reveals its significance simply by being told. Readers won't gather from her account that there are any concerns or controversies over decisions made in that initial Congress-principally by James Madison, then leader of the House of Representatives, but also by his colleagues. Did those men err in some of their choices? Americans have endlessly debated parts of the Bill, especially the Second Amendment of late, while venerating others, such as the First; Berkin briefly alludes to such matters but makes no connection between them and the Bill's framers. This is narrative, celebratory history at its purest. What it lacks is a point of view in addition to the story. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Syndetic Solutions - CHOICE_Magazine Review for ISBN Number 9781476743790
The Bill of Rights : The Fight to Secure America's Liberties
The Bill of Rights : The Fight to Secure America's Liberties
by Berkin, Carol
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CHOICE_Magazine Review

The Bill of Rights : The Fight to Secure America's Liberties

CHOICE


Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.

Historian Berkin (Baruch College, CUNY) offers a concise rendering of the crafting of the Bill of Rights, particularly the instrumental role played by Virginia's James Madison. George Mason urged addition of a bill of rights, but Madison largely shaped many of the actual amendments. Berkin relates how the 54 delegates in Philadelphia's Independence Hall subscribed to the rule of law, separation of powers, and a republic based on the consent of the governed. During the ratification fight, Federalists and anti-Federalists clashed ideologically and philosophically regarding the American Revolution's meaning. The promise to add a bill of rights allowed for narrow ratification. The first Congress under the new national document, to Madison's surprise, proved reluctant to devise such constitutional protections. Painstakingly, Madison battled to win support for the promised amendments, which hearkened to imperial abuses, religious differences, and a felt need to provide protections against potential government abuses. In December 1791, the requisite 11th state ratified the Bill of Rights, although Georgia, Connecticut, and Massachusetts failed to do so for almost another 150 years. What never ended was the ideological clash between state and federal authority. A good primer for general libraries. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --Robert C. Cottrell, California State University, Chico

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