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Keep out of reach of children : Reye's syndrome, aspirin, and the politics of public health

Largent, Mark A. (Author).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at Kirtland Community College.

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Kirtland Community College Library RJ 520 .R43 L37 2015 30775305485832 General Collection Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781934137888
  • ISBN: 193413788X
  • ISBN: 9781934137895
  • Physical Description: print
    271 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Publisher: New York : Bellevue Literary Press, 2015.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Summary, etc.: "A modern medical mystery about an illness that ravaged healthy children, changed policy, and vanished before a cause was found"--Provided by publisher.
Subject: Reye's syndrome Etiology
Aspirin
Public health Political aspects
Reye Syndrome etiology
Aspirin adverse effects
Child
History, 20th Century
Politics
Public Health history
Reye Syndrome history

Syndetic Solutions - Library Journal Review for ISBN Number 9781934137888
Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health
Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health
by Largent, Mark A.
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Library Journal Review

Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health

Library Journal


(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

In the past, Reye's syndrome-a condition that causes swelling in the brain and liver- affected some healthy young children who were recovering from the flu or other minor maladies. They would become suddenly very ill, suffer liver failure, and often end up in a coma. Many died. The author (science, technology, public policy, Michigan State Univ; Vaccine) who survived this disease, documents the attempt to find a cause and prevent further cases. When the syndrome was first noted in 1963, researchers thought that the use of aspirin to lower fevers was the cause. Others suspected pesticides applied to eradicate spruce budworm or aflatoxins in moldy food. Congress held hearings and wanted warning labels put on aspirin, but the drug companies were against this. Eventually, a mild warning was added and physicians counseled parents about not using aspirin for children. Investigations never found anything more than correlation and the disease disappeared in the late 1980s. The book is an absorbing study of the interrelationships of science, business, politics, and public health. It is part of the publisher's "Pathographics" series, dedicated to the memory of popular science writer Dr. Lewis Thomas. VERDICT An intriguing look at research and its shortcomings. Both professionals and lay readers interested in science will enjoy this work. Academic and large public libraries will want to add it to their collections.-Barbara Bibel, Oakland P.L. (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 9781934137888
Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health
Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health
by Largent, Mark A.
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BookList Review

Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

The personal is political, and medical. In this fascinating account, Reye's syndrome-survivor Largent weaves his own tale throughout the bigger story about this puzzling medical condition. A professor, dean, and science historian and policy expert, Largent nearly died in 1972 at age two and a half, when diarrhea, vomiting, breathing difficuties, and brain swelling killed half of Reye's victims. A top-notch doctor properly treated him with fluids, potassium, dextrose, and glucose. Largent explains how aspirin became the villain blamed for the onset of Reye's syndrome but raises questions about whether pesticides and a certain enzyme deficiency may have also played roles. This thought-provoking work certainly meets the goal of the publisher's Pathologies Series to chart the impact of disease on human individuals and populations from the biological, historical, and cultural perspectives. Reye's syndrome (named after one of the doctors who published the first study of the syndrome in 1963) has all but disappeared, possibly because of warning labels on aspirin. But Largent convincingly makes the case that it, like so many medical conditions, remains an unsolved mystery.--Springen, Karen Copyright 2015 Booklist

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 9781934137888
Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health
Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health
by Largent, Mark A.
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Publishers Weekly Review

Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health

Publishers Weekly


In 1985, the federal government required that aspirin bottles warn about the drug's potential to cause Reye's syndrome in children. But was the claim true? This meticulous book by science historian Largent (Vaccine: The Debate in Modern America) says the answer is murky. Cases plummeted after a 1980 peak "in concert with the decreasing use of aspirin in children," precluding gold-standard causal proof. The toxic behavior of some involved parties, Largent found, was easier to spot. Despite studies finding a "strong" link between aspirin use and Reye's, the labeling movement was slowed by the anti-regulation mood of the 1980s. "Almost every area of vital concern to consumers was adversely affected by the [Reagan] Administration's relentless drive to deny the role of government in protecting citizens," said the National Consumer League. Unsavory tactics included one official's use of private calls and meetings instead of memos and testimony-to avoid "fingerprints"-during his anti-labeling campaign. Yet many labeling advocates were overly triumphant about the eventual labeling, Largent says, and mysteries remain, including the fact that Reye's disappeared "even in countries where aspirin consumption was always quite low." If one thing becomes clear in Largent's narrative, it's that the regulatory process itself is disordered. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Syndetic Solutions - CHOICE_Magazine Review for ISBN Number 9781934137888
Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health
Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health
by Largent, Mark A.
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CHOICE_Magazine Review

Keep Out of Reach of Children : Reye's Syndrome, Aspirin, and the Politics of Public Health

CHOICE


Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.

Keep Out of Reach of Children reads differently than many medical histories do, primarily because science historian Largent (Michigan State) himself suffered from Reye's syndrome. His familiarity with this condition and the manner in which his near-death experience is dramatically revealed in the prologue guide the entire narrative. Thus, this is not a dry text. Largent recounts leads and possible causes as well as many dead ends. Readers participate in the frustrations of the parents and doctors who see children die or become incapacitated. Meanwhile, industry, politicians, and scientists are all working to manage their responsibilities. The best example of these interacting forces is in chapter 3, "The Deadly Mist," in which the author discusses the conflicts between business and government interests and researchers and families. Even the conclusion is not satisfactory. As soon as a possible culprit, salicylic acid, was identified and targeted studies were prepared for implementation, the disease disappeared. The writing is clear and engaging while remaining scientific. Ample notes (43 pages) from a variety of sources support the text. Largent is also the author of Vaccine (CH, Feb'13, 50-3297). Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above; general readers. --John P. Bourgeois, Nicholls State University

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