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Gravity : how the weakest force in the universe ... Read More

Clegg, Brian.(Author).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at Kirtland Community College.

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0 current holds with 1 total copy.

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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Kirtland Community College Library QC 178 .C544 2012 30775305485857 General Collection Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780312616298 (hardback)
  • ISBN: 0312616295 (hardback)
  • ISBN: 9781466802520 (e-book)
  • ISBN: 1466802529 (e-book)
  • Physical Description: 322 pages ; 22 cm
  • Edition: 1st ed.
  • Publisher: New York : St. Martin's Press, 2012.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
What goes up -- A natural tendency -- Gravity ... Read More
Summary, etc.:
"Physicists will tell you that four forces control ... Read More
Subject: Gravity.
Gravitation.
General relativity (Physics)

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 9780312616298
Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives
Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives
by Clegg, Brian
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Publishers Weekly Review

Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

As the most familiar physical force in the universe, gravity may not seem exciting, but British science writer Clegg (Armageddon Science) shows how this "omnipresent" force-which strengthens bones and muscles and binds together planets, stars, and galaxies-is anything but simple. The history of gravity theory begins with the ancient Greeks, who reasoned that "earthy" (as opposed to "airy") objects had a kind of "natural heaviness" that made them "want to be at the center of the universe." Centuries later, Galileo's experiments with pendulums and rolling spheres revealed gravity as a force that controlled motion everywhere, but even Isaac Newton's laws of motion failed to pierce the veil around this mysterious "action at a distance." It took Einstein's groundbreaking work on relativity theory to reveal how much gravity shapes the universe, warping space into an invisible world only revealed second-hand by the movement of masses and light. Clegg's accessible presentation offers insight into everything from Aristotelian science to black holes and string theory as it reveals the complexities and surprises of a familiar force that continues to surprise scientists. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 9780312616298
Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives
Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives
by Clegg, Brian
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BookList Review

Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

Gravity is one of the most accepted laws of science. Drop an object and it falls to earth because of the attraction between the earth and the object. What alerts the earth and the object to act? Is there a sort of communication between them? Theoretical physicists have struggled to explain gravitational attraction over distance since Einstein posed his theories of special and general relativity. Quantum theory, string theory, M theory, and other theoretical inquiries have failed to solve the riddle. In his history of gravity from the Big Bang to the present, popular science author Clegg recounts international efforts to understand what is thought to be the weakest yet most essential force holding the universe together. Black holes, warps in space and time, and antimatter are featured in this wide-ranging account, which will be of interest to science students and readers of science fiction.--Roche, Rick Copyright 2010 Booklist

Syndetic Solutions - Library Journal Review for ISBN Number 9780312616298
Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives
Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives
by Clegg, Brian
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Library Journal Review

Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives

Library Journal


(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Clegg (How To Build a Time Machine: The Real Science of Time Travel) acquaints readers with a very familiar force in their lives: gravity. To most people, gravity seems awfully powerful since it keeps them (and everything else) attached to Earth. As Clegg explains, however, gravity is, in fact, one of the weakest forces of nature, as he indicates in his subtitle. He takes readers on a delightful conversational tour of how gravity works and how humanity came to understand it. He brings to life household names like Newton and Einstein and the scientific circles in which they worked and lived. Explanations of giant stars and atomic nuclei demonstrate aspects of gravity most people don't think about, which makes this book all the more fascinating. VERDICT Lovers of science who are not well versed in its mechanics will find this book absorbing. Recommended.-Margaret Dominy, Drexel Univ. Lib., Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Syndetic Solutions - CHOICE_Magazine Review for ISBN Number 9780312616298
Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives
Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives
by Clegg, Brian
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CHOICE_Magazine Review

Gravity : How the Weakest Force in the Universe Shaped Our Lives

CHOICE


Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.

British popular science writer Clegg (Light Years, CH, May'08, 45-5050; Infinity, CH, Jun'04, 41-5953) provides an enjoyable, cleverly explained, and fast-paced history of gravity. He begins with the Greeks. Aristotle's view of gravity held until the Renaissance, when his ideas were displaced by hard-fought insights from Copernicus, Kepler, Brahe, Galileo, Newton, Huygens, and Hooke. Their theories coalesced into the pre-Einstein conceptualization of gravity. The contemporary interpretation of gravity, including Einstein's general theory of relativity and attempts at unifying gravity with quantum mechanics, is a primary focus of this history. Clegg concludes with antigravity and efforts to create antigravity mechanisms, clearly establishing why such ventures have not succeeded. He provides surprising value in showcasing exemplars of the scientific method--the reader can readily appreciate how science happens--and in debunking legends using critical thinking. For example, Galileo probably never dropped balls of varying weights from the Pisa bell tower; Galileo was very vocal about his accomplishments and never mentions this experiment. However, Galileo did use logic to deduce that balls will fall at the same speed. In 1971 during the Apollo 15 mission, a hammer and feather fell at the same speed on the moon, dramatically proving Galileo's assertion. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and general readers. M. Mounts Dartmouth College


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