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The myth of fair and efficient government : why ... Read More

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  • 1 of 1 copy available at Kirtland Community College.

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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Kirtland Community College Library JK 421 .M375 2011 30542383 General Collection Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780313392917 (hardcopy : alk. paper)
  • ISBN: 0313392919 (hardcopy : alk. paper)
  • ISBN: 9780313392924 (ebook)
  • ISBN: 0313392927 (ebook)
  • Physical Description: viii, 214 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Publisher: Santa Barbara, Calif. : Praeger, c2011.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
Our disappointment with government -- What markets ... Read More
Summary, etc.:
Beset by economic woes with hard-to-understand ... Read More
Subject: Administrative agencies > United States > Management.
Fiscal policy > United States.
Taxation > United States.

Syndetic Solutions - Summary for ISBN Number 9780313392917
The Myth of Fair and Efficient Government : Why the Government You Want Is Not the One You Get
The Myth of Fair and Efficient Government : Why the Government You Want Is Not the One You Get
by Marlow, Michael L.
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Summary

The Myth of Fair and Efficient Government : Why the Government You Want Is Not the One You Get


A fascinating exposé explaining why the government we have bears so little relation to the government we want--and why the recent expansion of government programs will only exacerbate the problem. Idealized views of government lead to bitterly unhappy citizens posits The Myth of Fair and Efficient Government: Why the Government You Want Is Not the One You Get . In fact, Michael L. Marlow says, government is the last place to look for efficiency. It is, rather, private markets that naturally drive toward efficient outcomes and it is unreasonable to expect governments to mimic those effects. This idea will startle many readers, especially given the widespread belief that private markets caused the current economic problems. The author's intention is to awaken readers to the invalidity of that assumption, to make us "pause before calling upon the government to somehow be efficient and fair in responding to the supposed collapse of private markets." To that end, this book demonstrates why romantic views of government promote a less efficient economy; why so many government programs are inefficient in practice; and why a more limited role for government is critical to reviving trust in our institutions.

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